Tag Archives: bible study

The Long and Winding Road

So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; from David to the deportation to Babylon, fourteen generations; and from the deportation to Babylon to the Messiah, fourteen generations.

-Matthew 1:17 (NASB)

I’m beginning another trek through Matthew and stopped for a bit today to think about the long list of names that begin his Gospel. Patriarchs, kings, ordinary folks, and some notable women run through this genealogy. Lists of names, which are found so often in the Old Testament but much less so in the New, don’t on the surface seem to make for great reading. But I look at these names with a bit of wonder; fallen men and women, some with great but flawed makeups (Abraham, David, Solomon), others with lives that resembled the thief on the cross (Manasseh). In The Gospel of the Kingdom, C.H. Spurgeon remarked, “We will not pry into the mystery of the incarnation, but we must wonder at the condescending grace which appointed our Lord such a pedigree.” All of these share in the long line of God’s faithfulness – a promise made to Abraham in Genesis 12 that in him, “all the families of the earth will be blessed”; to David in 2 Samuel 7 that “Your house and your kingdom shall endure before Me forever; your throne shall be established forever.” Promises separated by hundreds of years …and I find it greatly humbling that now thousands of years later, this long and winding road now puts we who belong to God in this same story.

It’s difficult not to feel a mix of emotions when thinking about each of the names in Matthew 1:1-17 – frustration, anger, sadness, pity. It’s also easy to look at my own life and feel the exact same things. But this genealogy that Matthew preserves for us reminds us that all of us – sinful, wretched, and fallen as we all are, all who come to Christ -by grace through faith- can be assured that He will in no way cast them out (John 6:37). All of us can then rightly take our place in this grand story and be assured He who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus (Philippians 1:6).

Image via Sten [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

Book Review: “Asking the Right Questions”

I’m on vacation this week and trying to catch up on reading. It took me just two days to finish Matthew Harmon’s new book, Asking the Right Questions: A Practical Guide to Understanding and Applying the Bible. I found Harmon’s book a helpful guide​ to reading, interpreting, and applying the Bible. Harmon begins with a flyover guide to the Bible based on six pieces – creation, crisis, covenants, Christ, church, and consummation. He then spends the majority of the book on developing the right questions to ask in our Bible reading. I found his discussion of the “fallen condition” vs. the “gospel solution” especially good. He provides an outline at the end of the book that summarizes his main discussion on understanding and applying the Bible, which would be good to print out and keep in your Bible.

Overall, this is a good resource for getting a grasp of the Bible’s big picture and tools for understanding and application. You can watch Harmon discuss his book below:

 

A View of Grace

Mont_Blanc_oct_2004

“In the forest on the high banks of the river Aar, just outside the town, there is a bench where you can sit and enjoy an unusually good view of the Alps. But the clearing which makes this view possible is continually being overgrown and the trees have to be cut back every few years. In the same way, our view of grace is constantly being obscured by the cares of our time and the riches of the world, so that it is necessary to have our view of grace cleared not only every few years, but Sunday after Sunday, indeed even daily.”

-Walter Lüthi, from The Letter to the Romans, pg. xi

True Religion

Amos

Amos the Prophet

“In personal terms, true religion is to respond fully to the grace and law of God, living out the law in a life of obedience, resting on the grace both for ability and forgiveness; towards God, true religion is a reverent hearing and receiving of His Word; and towards other people it appears as honesty, considerateness and unfailing concern for the needy. Take these things away and what remains does nothing more than invite the adverse judgment of God.”

– J. Alec Motyer, from The Message of Amos, p. 18

Who’s in Charge?

Alan Redpath

Alan Redpath

“While it is true that Jesus is King according to our lips, in truth and in practice do we act in utter contradiction to Him? Do we acknowledge His right of sovereignty, Christian friends, but are not crowning Him in our lives? We say, ‘Thine is the kingdom’; we trust in Him and receive Him as our Saviour. We believe that He indwells our hearts by the Holy Spirit. In theory He is King, but let me ask you, in practice, who is running your life?”

– Alan Redpath, from Victorious Praying, p. 124

Reading Luke

As I mentioned in a previous post, my plan this year is to focus on Luke and Acts in my Bible study. Going through these two books slowly has been on my mind for some time, and I’m glad to have the opportunity to do it. I’m just one month in and have only gotten through Luke 3. If you’re interested in studying Luke in this way, here are some of the resources I’ve been leaning on in my study so far. And if you know of any additional materials I’m missing, please let me know!

Bible Reading in 2014

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Well it’s New Year’s resolution time again. January is also the time when you see many articles and encouragements for read the Bible in a year plans. I’ve found these plans to be great helps to reading the entire Bible through in a year’s time and an excellent aid to keep that goal on track, and have read through the Bible several times with these. You can find many great plans listed here.

One thing that I’ve struggled with in these plans is the tendency to check off my reading for the day and never return to it for reflection or additional study. Sometimes I’d go through an entire book without pausing to consider how it fits into the Bible’s overall picture. So this year, Lord willing, I’m going to try something a little different. For whatever reason, I’ve focused more on the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and John in my previous studies than on Luke, and even less so on his follow-up writing of the book of Acts. So I’m planning on spending the year in Luke and Acts, reading and rereading the texts, and as much as I can of sermons, commentaries, and other background material on those two books. My guess is I’ll spend about 8 months in Luke and 4 months in Acts, but we’ll see. I’ll of course read other books of the Bible throughout the year, but I wanted to make sure I had enough time to fully focus on Luke’s writings without lapsing into a checklist mentality from a full Bible reading plan. I’ve tried a similar approach with smaller books such as 1 John, 1 Peter, and others, mainly through John MacArthur’s Bible study suggestions, and have found my understanding of these books was greatly helped. My Twitter friend Renee has been going through the Gospel of John for the past year or so, which encouraged me as well.

I’m excited to focus on studying Luke and Acts in this way and look forward to seeing where it leads. The main thing, I think, is spending time in God’s Word each day and learning to live more like Jesus. We’ll see how it goes!