Book Review: “Do More Better”

41fXfohImwL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_Would you like to be more productive? Most of us would answer yes to that question, even as the busyness of our lives sometimes wears on us. But have you thought about why you want to be more productive? Along with providing tools and tips to improve your productivity, Tim Challies’ Do More Better gives insight into why productivity  matters, why doing more good is the goal, and Who is the reason for it all.

Any new habit or plan will ultimately fail if there is no strong foundation to keep it going – to return to when days become mundane. Although we want to know the tools that will help us get from point A to point Z, Challies delays providing this right away. Instead he walks his readers through a “productivity catechism”, which ultimately leads to the mission statement, or foundation, of the book:

Productivity is effectively stewarding your gifts, talents, time, energy, and enthusiasm for the good of others and the glory of God.

This charts the course of the book, and Challies returns to this statement again and again. He goes on to describe common obstacles (“productivity thieves”) that often get in our way, such as laziness and busyness. Challies then asks his readers to spend some time thinking about two major topics:

  • defining our major responsibilities
  • stating our mission

This is a two-pronged approach in that we define our major responsibilities (work, family, church, etc.) and then select a mission statement to guide each of these areas. These could take some time to reflect on and complete, but they must be done if we want to use the practical tools that he provides later on most effectively.

All of us have different ways that we organize and keep track of our day. Some are basic, some can be quite extensive. In the second half of the book, Challies recommends three online tools:

Challies is quick to note that we may find other tools (paper planners, alternative software) that are more suitable to our tasks. But his main point remains – we need a place to manage the tasks we’re responsible for; we need somewhere to track our meetings and appointments; and we need somewhere to “gather, store, and access (our) information, and do it in a logical hierarchical fashion.” (p. 68)

There are other neat features of Challies’ book, including “serve and surprise” along with an appendix describing “20 Tips to Increase Your Productivity”, but you’ll have to buy the book to see these in detail.

I found this book quite helpful for a number of reasons. First, we often start out with great energy on getting things done, but just as often don’t think of the why behind doing all of it. Challies’ productivity statement, mentioned above, provides a foundation for us. I’m going to print this out and place it in prominent places by my desk at home and work. Second, the benefits of the productivity tools are clearly outlined. I’ve used Todoist for a couple of weeks now and find it useful, and it nags me appropriately to do the things that I’m behind on. I’ve been using Google Calendar for years, so he didn’t have to sell me on that. I confess that I’m not quite sure about Evernote yet, and whether the time it will take to get everything in there will be worth it. But I’m definitely going to try it out.

Overall, I think Challies blends the why and the how extremely well in this book, as we look forward to a new year and the goal of being more productive in all we do. The time invested in reading this book will pay off, if you follow the steps as he has outlined them. I’d recommend Do More Better and would give it 4 out of 5 stars.

I received a free copy of this book from Cruciform Press in exchange for an impartial review

 

 

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2 responses to “Book Review: “Do More Better”

  1. I enjoyed this book by Tim Challies as well. It inspired me to create a Todoist project template based upon the M’Cheyne 1 Year Bible Reading Plan. Check it out if this is of interest to you. http://bit.ly/28K8TvZ

  2. Thank you so much for visiting and for sharing this. M’Cheyne was a great man of God!

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